Protege Undergraduate Research Program

Background:

The protege program was started by the College of Engineering and Applied Science during the summer of 2013. The goal of the program is to make students aware of opportunities for careers in research. These opportunities are for outstanding first-year students to work with leading CEAS research faculty in their faculty labs during the summer after their first year in CEAS. 

The program initially included five to six students per year but in 2016, the program was expanded to eleven students and included research at industrial and governmental partners. The program has been administered by a committee of senior faculty members (J. Boerio, T. Mantei, and R. Huston)

Benefits:

The Protege program enhances the student experience by having them learn to conduct research, work as part of a team, keep laboratory notebooks, write reports, and make presentations.

In addition, students are paid at the rate of $15.00 per hour for 40 hours of work each week between 12-15 weeks in the summer.  The length of the program is at the discretion of the mentor, 12 week being the minimum.

The opportunity allows students to determine if they wish to pursue a co-op position and career in research. At the same time, participating industrial and governmental partners have an early opportunity to recruit highly talented and motivated student researchers.

Selection Process:

Each spring, first year CEAS students who performed at a high level during the autumn semester are identified by a CEAS faculty committee. Most participating students have grade point averages ≥ 3.75. Students are interviewed to determine interest in research careers and availability to work in Cincinnati or at the location of an industrial or governmental partner over the summer.

Interviews are conducted by the CEAS faculty committee and by participating partners in which a diverse groups of students are selected.

Expectations:

–Report for work at appropriate times

-Learn as much as possible about your project

–Show interest in and enthusiasm for the project

–Do good research

–Participate in initial workshop

–Submit a short mid-summer report

–Submit a short final report

–Participate in final symposium

–Don’t work more than forty (40) hours per week!

–Contact Dr. James Boerio, (f.james.boerio@uc.edu) if there are any problems

Types of Research Projects:

Research projects that are involved with the Protege program must advance the state of knowledge or understanding in a particular field. Students do not usually define the project and are defined by the mentors. These are not make-work projects. Protégé students usually contribute to an important, larger project that are usually funded by some agency or industry that are important to the company. Students and mentors must agree on the project