Pitching Makes Perfect

By:     Staci Jones
Date:  July 13, 2017

UC CEAS students present their business ideas, methods, and techs at the Engineeering Innovation Track (EIT) Pitch event. 
 

Adam Veres, Robert Hodge, Christopher Chochran, Eric Kahny, Christopher Merz and Johnathan Lange pitch their feasibility study for FSAE.

Adam Veres, Robert Hodge, Christopher Chochran, Eric Kahny, Christopher Merz and Johnathan Lange pitch their feasibility study for FSAE.


University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Engineering and Applied Science (CEAS) students closed the spring semester with presentations at the Engineering Innovation Track (EIT) Pitch event. The aim of the event is to help students establish confidence in presenting their ideas, get feedback from classmates and mentors, and to experience being challenged on business ideas, methods, and technology.

The pitches ranged from concepts such as a thermo-electric watch to creating a residential natural gas turbine.

A feasibility study for a Formula SAE (FSAE) electric racecar was presented by Adam Veres, Robert Hodge, Christopher Chochran, Eric Kahny, Christopher Merz and Johnathan Lange.

Their project will collaborate with Bearcat Motorsports in the Formula SAE Competition. More than 200 colleges compete yearly since the competition’s founding in 1980. The electric focus of the competition was added in 2013.

The UC group plans to test and analyze propulsion systems while developing a full paper design for an FSAE electric racecar. They hope that in competing in the SAE Competition, they will be able to market the strengths of CEAS and provide experience for students to learn about electrical vehicles.

Bryant Crouch, Andrew Stockdale, Zachary Jones, Lisa Barkalow and Varun Nagarajan presented their Apex, Advanced Power Explorations project. The project is working to create a residential natural gas turbine with combined heat and power (CHP) that will aid residents in saving money and allowing them to disconnect from the electrical grid.

The overall project consists of three major parts: senior design, which will develop the power generator and integration; niche product, which will work on an innovation track for post-graduation; and further developing the product for agriculture, residential, and small business, and scale.

So far, the students have acquired a JetCat p80 engine and are currently working on the other aspects of the project. They hope that their system will provide 90% efficiency versus the current average of 40% (without usage of the exhaust gas).

Tyler Kittel, Adam McCoy, and Spencer Lewis presented their thermo-electric watch design. Through the project, they plan to utilize interwoven metal mesh to create a flexible band powered solely by body heat. A thermoelectric device will be sandwiched between protective layers for smooth contact with the user. They are currently working on the convection and conduction phase of the design.

Professor Clarissa Belloni, Adjunct Assistant Professor in the CEAS Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, states that her favorite part of the EIT Presentations is, “seeing students take ownership of their ideas, and listening to the discussion round,” which is where students discuss amongst colleagues and faculty members the different directions and routes for their projects.

The students will continue working on their designs throughout the upcoming school year and some teams plan to recruit more students throughout the College.