Activity 3

Author:

Marie Pollitt

Lesson Title:

Challenge

Activity Title:

The Golden Ratio

Lesson Duration:

5 days

Activity Duration:

3 days

Setting:

Classroom (with internet access and 1:1 chromebooks)

Date:

July 15, 2016

Activity Objectives:
  • Students will create a 2-D, detailed, sketch for their graphic design.
  • Students will create a 2-D, technological sketch for their graphic design usings desmos.
Activity Guiding Questions:
  • What does a graphic designer do?
  • What stages does a graphic designer go through when designing a logo?
  • What makes a sketch a “good” sketch?
  • How detailed do sketches need to be?
  • What is a reference point for the sketch?
  • What is the scale size for the sketch?
  • Why is it important to make a sketch that is to scale and detailed?
  • What is desmos and how does it work?
  • How do you restrict the domain/range of functions in desmos?
Materials:
Teacher Advance Preparation:

Have graph paper ready for student to create sketch.

Activity Procedures:

Day 4

  • Students begin to sketch multiple iterations of possible design.
    • Task 1: Students each brainstorm a design
    • Task 2: Students select a final brainstorm to begin sketching
      • **fill out EDP WS and get approved by design CEO (teacher).
      • ***Checkpoint: end of the day, must choose one as a team, approved by Ms. A

Day 5

  • Students begin to make a detailed 2-D sketch using a coordinate grid and symmetry.
  • Discuss with students what a “good sketch” entails and how specific they need to be.
  • Let them learn this on their own – it may take them multiple sketches before its approved.
  • Tell students they should be able to give their sketch to someone else in order to create the design in desmos.
    • Checkpoint: by end of day, must have completed sketch approved by Ms. A.
    • **Includes Select, Implement, Evaluate Solution, Communicate, and Refine Solution of EDP WS/Process

Day 6

  • Students will begin to create their sketch using the desmos software
  • Pull the technology manager aside to teach them how to restrict the domain/range in desmos.
    • Checkpoint: end of day, students must have desmos design complete, approved by Ms.A
    • Includes Select, Implement, Evaluate Solution, Communicate, and Refine Solution of EDP WS/Process
Formative Assessments
  • Students sketches on each day 4-6, must be approved by teacher at the end of each day
  • EDP WS’s will also be used for assessment.
Differentiation:

Students can view tutorials for graphing equations in slope-intercept form that are posted on google classroom

Reflection:

The students that had more exact sketches had an easier time using desmos. So, providing them with an example may help them know the level of detail I want them to get to.

Unit Academic Standards 

8.EE.5: Graph proportional relationships, interpreting the unit rate as the slope of the graph. Compare two different proportional relationships represented in different ways. For example, compare a distance-time graph to a distance-time equation to determine which of two moving objects has greater speed.

8.EE.6: Use similar triangles to explain why the slope m is the same between any two distinct points on a non-vertical line in the coordinate plane; derive the equation y = mx for a line through the origin and the equation y = mx + b for a line intercepting the vertical axis at b.

8.F.1: Understand that a function is a rule that assigns to each input exactly one output. The graph of a function is the set of ordered pairs consisting of an input and the corresponding output.1

8.F.3: Interpret the equation y = mx + b as defining a linear function, whose graph is a straight line; give examples of functions that are not linear. For example, the function A = s^2 giving the area of a square as a function of its side length is not linear because its graph contains the points (1,1), (2,4) and (3,9), which are not on a straight line.

Common Core State Standards -- Mathematics (CCSS)

Standards for Mathematical Practice

Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them

Reason abstractly and quantitatively

Use appropriate tools strategically

Model with mathematics

Attend to precision